Cars.com Ranks Top 5 Automotive Memory Lapses

Recently posted to cars.com was a survey of 1,000 motorists by Hankook tires. In the survey, respondents were asked about forgetful times they have had in the operation of their vehicle. Memory lapses happen to the best of us, and what seems to be like the worst times possible. Some of the results which people admitted to included forgetting car keys, forgetting parking spaces and leaving items on the roof of their car. Check out the complete list below which we have offered out own analysis of.

 

1. Forgetting Where You Parked

The most common answer given to the survey was forgetting where the individual parked. Unfortunately, there was no demographic information to delve into the causes which result in forgetting where you parked. One may venture to guess that the higher the age of the respondent, the more likely they would be to respond that they had forgotten where they parked their vehicle. Over 50% of people answered that they had forgotten where they parked their car before, with the exact percentage being 55% of respondents.

2. Had to Call a Locksmith

Taking the number two spot in the survey for forgetful automotive behavior is having to call a locksmith with 41% of respondents saying that this had happened to them. To Phila-Locksmith this does not come as much of a shock. The Hankook survey does not break down answers by locksmith service needed, which means a respondent could answer yes to this question for a variety of locksmith service reasons. Likely the biggest reason for needing to call a locksmith because of a lapse in memory is being locked out. Everyday, people find themselves in a locked out state, which occurs much more frequently than people would think. Another reason that someone may have to make the call to a locksmith is if they lost their car keys. Now locksmiths are able to come directly to the car’s location to complete replacement, which makes getting over that specific memory lapse a little easier to deal with.

3. Used a GPS Device for Navigation

With little background information on this third ranked memory lapse there are a lot of unanswered questions. First the statistic, 40% of respondents said that they used a GPS Device to get them started to their destination. If this includes motorists who are going to new locations, this answer is surprisingly low on the list. GPS is not only more common in vehicles, but also through the use of a smart phone. However, this number could also be very concerning. If someone has a memory lapse so badly that they can not remember how to get to a frequently visited location then it may not be the safest to have those individuals on the roadways.

4. Forgot to Put the Gas Cap On

Perhaps the smallest slip of the mind on the survey comes in ranked at #4. This number is surprisingly low, perhaps because individuals are shy to let such a slip of the mind known to surveyors. However, this slip of the mind is the easiest and least expensive situation to have replaced.

5. Forgot Something on the Roof

A surprisingly large amount of respondents answered yes to leaving items on top of the roof of their vehicle before driving away. A full 26% of respondents admitted to this slip-up which normally passes as bad daytime TV slapstick comedy. Of course, we all are busy in our own ways and in the excitement of the day, something like leaving an item on top of your car can easily happen, as demonstrated by the survey.

Hopefully this survey can act as a reminder to drivers to always take a second to calmly think about things which they may not think of otherwise. While memory lapses like locking your keys in the car, or forgetting a parking spot, can cost money and be a headache to deal with there can be more dire consequences. In some cases, parents have forget their child on the roof of the car while driving. It is important for all motorists to remember that there is always time to think about safety.

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From Keyless Ignitions to Digital Smart Keys?

At the end of 2014, we covered the move that General Motors was making towards the implementation of keyless ignitions in a majority of the vehicle models that they make. This signaled the beginning of what could be a slow death of traditional bladed car keys, but a Toronto company wants to take this idea a step further. The Globe and Mail in Canada has the scoop on Keyfree technologies, a start up which is aiming to revolutionize the car key game even further than the introduction of keyless ignition systems would.

Smart Phones as Car Keys

Keyfree’s aim is extremely similar to what August and Lockitron want to accomplish with their smart technology enabled residential locks. Users would be able to install the device on their vehicle and then operate that vehicle through an application on their smart phone. Not only would this allow for the car owner to start the vehicle while they were in the car, but also remotely. In addition to remote function, car owners would be able to send, and remove, key access to other smart phones in just a matter of moments.

While sending access via smart phone will certainly lead to some security concerns fro car owners, Keyfree is angling, at least initially, to dealerships and rental car companies. Without having to constantly grab keys, or have copies made, these types of businesses could certainly benefit from the convenience that Keyfree is offering. However, these initial security concerns are certainly not to be taken lightly. Residential locks faced heavy scrutiny due to safety concerns when they originally hit the market and the scrutiny is sure to be stronger for Keyfree due to the ability for criminals to easily vanish with a vehicle once they have access. One way to alleviate this concern is the additional GPS tracking feature which Keyfree uses. Using the GPS feature car owners would not only give police vital information if their car was stolen, but can also be used in everyday situations, like finding your car when you have forgotten where you parked. You can view Keyfree’s informational video below to see some of the features that they are eager to offer.

It will be interesting to see how the retail market will react to the introduction of Keyfree’s product, but the features they offer certainly fall in line with the technical advancements which are expected to come to the security market in the next few years. The introduction of this product will also make for an interesting dynamic in the development of keyless ignitions and their fobs. Will major automotive manufacturers continue to make a slow change over to keyless ignitions before making the leap to smart keys? Or, will they seize this new technology and take their vehicles further down the path of technical advancement? Stay tuned to Phila-Locksmith’s blog posts to get updated information, or voice your opinion in the comments below. Would you feel secure using your smart phone as a key for your car or do the security concerns scare you away? Major automotive manufacturers will have to make that choice soon as technology like this continues to find its way into more and more vehicles.

Car Theft Dramatically Decreasing Says Newly Released Statistics

(VIA National Insurance Crime Bureau) In the early 1990’s, the major automotive manufacturers faced a major issue. While their sales were on the rise, so were the theft of the vehicles that they were producing. In the year 1991, automotive thefts hit their all-time high with 1,661,738 vehicles being reported stolen. Not only was this the highest amount of automotive thefts reported in one year, but it also had the highest concentration of thefts per capita. During that year, there was an average of 659 vehicle thefts per 100,000 US citizens. Recently released statistics show that for the year 2013 there was a sharp decline in the amount of automotive theft that have taken place sine the year 1991, the year which had the most automotive thefts in United States history.

During 2013, 699,594 vehicles were reported stolen. This is a decrease of over 55% when compared to the year 1991. Not only was there a decrease in the overall amount of automotive thefts, but there was also a decrease in the amount of car thefts per capita. While there was an average of 659 vehicle thefts per 100,000 people in 1991, that number had decreased to less than 200 per 100,000 people. That shows a decrease of over 67% in the amount of thefts. This does raise a few questions, like; what has changed that allowed for such a dramatic decrease of automotive thefts?

Upgrades in Automotive Security

During the year 1991, thieves were commonly using the hot-wire method to steal vehicles. This is where a thief opens your dashboard or ignition in order to access the starter wire. Once the thief had access to that wire, by giving it a power charge they would be able to start the vehicle. The updated technology of transponder car keys has actively removed this method from thieves’ arsenals. Even with power being sent to the starter, a vehicle which has a transponder car key system will not start unless there is a key with a corresponding transponder chip inside of the ignition. While this has made vehicles more secure, it can also end up costing car owners. If you car key is lost and you need to call a mobile locksmith to replace it, a transponder car key will cost more to be replaced than a traditional blade key. The reason for this is that a new key must not only be cut to match the ignition, but it also must be programmed to the car’s computer in order for it to properly function.

Upgrades in automotive security are not the only factor that has assisted with this massive decline in automotive thefts. Police and other law enforcement agencies have implemented new strategies, while also dedicating more time, for fighting the plague of automotive thefts which had been going on during the early 1990’s. What law enforcement has done is set-up dedicated units which solely focus on automotive theft. They have also implemented “bait cars” and automated license plate readers. One assists police in getting automotive thieves off the street before they can strike an unsuspecting victim, while the other works to identify stolen vehicle and return them to their rightful owner.

There is no doubt that car owners should be encouraged by the sharp decrease in automotive thefts. After all, vehicles are extremely expensive pieces of equipment and their security needs to be at an acceptable level for this reason. As with many technologies, these security features may only be effective in the short-term. Thieves are always working to gain an advantage over those trying to stop them and it only figures to be a short period of time before they come up with a new and effective way to steal transponder car key vehicles. Currently thieves are preying on the carelessness and momentary lapses of judgement that vehicle owners may experience to steal vehicles in a less technical way.

Stolen Locksmith Tools Recovered

One locksmith in Fresno has to be breathing a deep sigh of relief after police recovered about $60,000 worth of his stolen locksmith equipment at a Fresno home last Friday. Like many locksmiths now-a-days the one from Fresno was a mobile locksmith who completed service right at his customer’s location. Since he was doing this, his parts and tools are always constantly inside of the van. Unfortunately for that locksmith, someone stole his entire van earlier in the week. While police were able to recover the van itself, they found that the thieves had already cleaned the entire thing out. That was until last Friday when police discovered all of the stolen materials when searching the home of a parolee in Central Fresno.

The reason that the locksmith had such a wealth of tools and parts inside of his van is that as a mobile locksmith he wants to be ready at all times to complete any type of service. This means that the locksmith not only has all of his expensive tools, but a collection of varying locks and keys for whichever service a customer may need. Luckily for car owners, the criminals were not able to use any of the stolen goods before the police discovered their location. Computer chip car keys have increased automotive security, but with the programming and cutting tools that a locksmith would normally have can give a criminal an easier avenue to steal your vehicle.

It is good for all that this can be chalked up to a learning lesson, especially since this locksmith stated he lost a large portion of his supplies in a warehouse fire not long ago. Police recovered 150 car keys, 50 locks and a laser key cutting machine among other supplies, which the Fresno locksmith must be happy to have back.